Jim Wendler 531 program for footballers

Jim Wendler’s 5/3/1 program is a famous program in the fitness world. This program is designed for lifters of all levels and can be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. In this blog post, we will discuss how Australian Rules Football players can benefit from using this program.

What is the 5/3/1 Program?

 

The 5/3/1 program is a weightlifting routine that was created by Jim Wendler. The program is designed to help lifters gradually increase their strength and size over time. The program is based on four core lifts: the squat, bench press, deadlift, and overhead press. Each lift is trained once per week, and each workout consists of five sets of three reps. The first set of each lift is performed at 65% of the lifter’s one-rep max, the second set at 75%, the third set at 85%, and the fourth and fifth sets are performed as “cluster sets” of three reps with 90% of the lifter’s one-rep max. The goal of the program is to gradually increase the amount of weight lifted over time, allowing the lifter to continue making progress for an extended period of time.

5/3/1 can be used by athletes of all levels of expertise. However, it is most commonly advised for intermediate athletes. 5/3/1/ may be ideal for you if you’re searching for short training sessions with slow but consistent growth. The creator of this program believes that starting light gives a lifter more room to advance. Because they do the lifts more regularly, brand new lifters are usually able to develop more quickly from a beginner routine. Its long-term training approach can also assist advanced lifters.

Can the 5/3/1 Program Be Adapted for AFL Athletes? 

Coaches frequently inquire about how 5/3/1 might be modified for athletes. Isn’t it a reasonable question? Obviously, the requirements of a performance-oriented athlete differ from those of a person who simply wants to get larger and stronger in general. However, little changes regardless of the sport you’re playing on the field. This is in opposition to “sport-specific training professionals” who try to persuade you that each athlete and sport is unique. But first, let’s look at the facts.

Athletes must have powerful hips, legs, shoulders, arms, and midsections in order to compete in any sport. A fundamental and effective barbell-training program is the greatest method to develop these areas. Weight training for sports is nothing more than General Physical Preparedness, hence there are no “sport-specific” workouts (GPP).

As a result, the goal is to improve these body areas by using the most effective weight-lifting exercises. Athletes must develop skills other than strength, and hence do not have the time to spend hours upon hours in the gym. They shouldn’t, at the very least.

Speed, strength, agility, conditioning, and, most importantly, skill work must all be practiced by an athlete. Spending too much time on one item can lead to problems in other areas. The weight room appears to take up the majority of time in the United States, particularly with football.

If you’re an athlete, you should be able to move around and get into the right positions in the sport, as well as be strong and explosive enough to get out of them.

Basic barbell lifts are the greatest and most efficient techniques to train the full body in any activity. Squats, deadlifts, presses, bench presses, and power cleans are among them. The athlete will develop stronger if they are performed with a full range of motion and proper loading. You’ll have a comprehensive strength-training program if you combine these routines with assistance work.

Watch this video on legendary coach Mike Boyle discussing sports specificity: 

What is Assistance Work?

When it comes to weightlifting, the term “assistance work” refers to exercises that are used to improve the performance of the primary lifts. For example, a powerlifter who is trying to increase their squat might do some heavy deadlifts as assistance work. This is because deadlifts help to build strength and size in the lower body, which can carry over to an increase in squatting ability. Similarly, a weightlifter who is trying to improve their jerk might do some overhead presses as assistance work. This is because overhead presses help to build strength and stability in the shoulders, which can lead to an increase in jerking ability. In general, assistance work should be specific to the needs of the lifter and should be tailored to complement the primary lifts. Used correctly, assistance work can be a powerful tool for improving strength and performance.

Can AFL Players Benefit From the 5/3/1 Program?

Listen to our podcast episode about how we adjust the program to suit footballers.

The answer is a resounding yes! In fact, the program can be of great benefit to any athlete looking to improve strength and performance. The key is to tailor the program to your specific needs and goals. For example, if you’re an AFL player looking to improve your speed and agility, you might want to focus on assistance work that helps to build explosive power, such as sprints and jumps. Alternatively, if you’re an AFL player looking to improve your strength and size, you might want to focus on assistance work that helps to build muscle mass, such as heavy lifting and bodybuilding exercises. 

Jim Wendler’s program is ideal for Australian Rules Footballers because it helps to improve speed, agility, and power. It is also effective for building muscle mass and improving strength. To make the program work for you, focus on assistance work that meets your specific needs and goals. And be sure to consult with a qualified strength and conditioning coach who can design a program that meets your specific needs.

Click here to join our AFL version of the Jim Wendler 5/3/1 program for FREE!

***

Be updated with the new trends. Listen to your favorite athletes and learn from reliable coaches. Subscribe to Prepare Like A Pro Youtube and Podcast!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.