Australias Leading High Performance Facilities for AthletesCategoriesBlog Coaches Elite Lifestyle High Performance PLP Podcast Training Program

Australia’s Leading High-Performance Facilities for Athletes

Australia is home to some of the best sporting facilities in the world. From Olympic-standard venues to dedicated high-performance facilities for athletes, you can have access to everything you need to reach your potential.

In this post, we’ll take a closer look at some strength and conditioning coaches and hear their thoughts about the current state of training in the country today. Whether you’re an AFL player looking for a place to train or you’re just interested in learning more about our sporting infrastructure, this post is sure to interest you!

The engaging forum was led by Jack Mclean, a strength and conditioning coach who founded the premier training program for footy players, Prepare Like a Pro.

Present during the forum was a host of Australia’s AFL strength and conditioning coaches and physios such as Chris Perkin, Director of Westcoast Health & High Performance, Sean Baker, the founder of Peaq Performance Centre, Christian Woodford, the Director of Woodford Sport Science Consulting, Jarrad Kay, founder of The Sixth Principle Gym, Durham McInnis, founder of Core Advantage, Lachlan Wilmot, co-founder of Athletes Authority, Michael Crichton co-owner of Melbourne Fitness & Performance and Tim Schleiger, the director at Sports Clinic of Melbourne.

The group’s consensus was that Australia is on par with the rest of the world in terms of strength and conditioning knowledge and facilities. However, there is always room for improvement, which this group of coaches is constantly striving for. Jarrad mentioned the lack of facilities hinder athletes’ ability to develop their speed, compared to facilities in the United States where athletes, young and old, have access to numerous tracks and turf fields.

“We’ve gotten really good at strength and conditioning. I would say and now what we found that the speed project and why we started this business during COVID mainly because our gyms were closed and we were locked out of them. Speed was that necessary missing link to the total puzzle, and I’m going to talk about that puzzle and analogy a little more because, at the moment, I think a lot of us are constrained by our facility size,” said Jarrad Kay.

 “When I was over in America, I went to this gym for easy speed performance and they had a 60-meter mondo track in their facility so they could hit some kind of top speed work where all of us, size and space is a big limitation especially down here in Melbourne. We’re lucky if we have 15-20 meters of turf to access, so acceleration is something that’s really well-worked into programs, but if we think about what our athletes are doing week in week out, they’re just accelerating every time at training.”

 “That’s the main quality of sprinting that they’re going to continuously hit so max velocity becomes that missing piece of the puzzle and that’s where we say ‘all right, how do we layer sprint training and how do we include max velocity that exposure these high-speed loads into an athlete’s program when we’re battling all the barriers that are going against it such as sports training and gym and everything else on top of it?’ So that’s the part of the puzzle that we like to explore, and we sit down with our athletes and work out how we can best do this,” Kay explained.

Woodford also spoke at length about the importance of social media in spreading strength and conditioning knowledge.

“I can’t say this enough. My biggest tip is to use social media to get what you believe in. I think so many people don’t use social media enough. Let’s forget about the algorithm and all that stuff but I think higher level. And you look at my good mate Jamie Smith from Melbourne’s Strength Culture. They’ve started a new podcast on YouTube and it’s been fantastic. And I think that’s another area where we’re gonna pick up again,” relayed Woodford.

“We’re gonna start my show again in that YouTube area which so many people watch. It has so much reach. That’s why all these other social media means like on Instagram and Facebook, they’re chasing YouTube so I think YouTube’s a big one. Getting content out on YouTube’s critical, but it’s just pushing across a message of what you believe in, you know. Show your athletes training. Show your passion. Show what you’re believing. Show your knowledge. Don’t be afraid of giving away free information.”

“I think that’s a big one in the industry. Showing that you actually do care and you do want to get the best results for your client athlete. That’s a very important thing you’re showing because there are a lot of people out there who don’t care about results. They are kind of just doing it for the money. They’re my two biggest tips: show through social media in terms of what you stand for what you believe in your passion and the second, that you actually really do care,” said Woodford.

Wilmot also discussed how much of an impact strength and conditioning coaches have on athletes, whether they’re as young as nine years old, or veterans trying to hold on to their professional careers.

“In professional sport, you know, strength conditioning coaches, we probably have a percentage of athletes that we impact more than others. Typically, when it comes to the very talented superstars, our influence on them can often be less. The older athlete often our influence can be sustaining careers for a little bit longer. But obviously, in the private sector, we were getting athletes at 13 to 17 years of age. To be able to influence them was really big, and that’s what we do in the private sector,” shared Wilmot.

If you are an athlete looking for a facility that can help you take your performance to the next level, then look no further than Prepare Like a Pro. Our world-class programming and expert coaching staff will have you primed and ready to perform at your best. Contact us today to learn more about our programs or book a tour of our facilities. We can’t wait to help you achieve your athletic goals!

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Be updated with the new trends. Listen to your favorite athletes and learn from reliable coaches. Subscribe to Prepare Like A Pro Youtube and Podcast!

 

Strength TrainingCategoriesBlog Training Program

Strength Training to Improve Australian Rules Footballers’ Physicality on the Field

Australian rules football is a physical sport. To compete at the elite level, you need to have a high level of physicality. One of the best methods to improve your physicality is through strength training. Strength training will help you increase your muscle mass, improve your power output and reduce your risk of injury. So, if you want to become a better Australian rules footballer, start strength training today!

Combat Training For AFL

 What is strength training, and how can it improve Australian rules footballers’ physicality on the field?

Strength training is a type of exercise that focuses on increasing your ability to generate a high amount of force. There are many different types of strength training, but most of them involve lifting weights or doing resistance exercises. The key to improving physicality by strength training is performing heavy compound movements. Compound movements are multi-joint exercises that increase muscle groups more than isolation exercises. For example, a bicep curl is an isolation exercise that only works your biceps. In contrast, a barbell back squat is a compound movement that works several muscle groups, including your quadriceps, trunk, and glutes.

 To perform well in Australian rules football and improve AFL upper body strength, it’s crucial to have a high power output level. Power output has three components: strength, speed, and endurance. Strength for a developing athlete is the most important of the three because it increases your maximum output which ultimately increases your speed endurance and overall power output. As you are physically mature you will need to focus on power training to improve your ability to generate force faster! 

To make sure you are maximising your efforts and time it’s important to become stronger and train with an experienced strength and conditioning coach. If you want to become a better Australian rules footballer, consider training with heavier weights because that will help you gain more lean muscle, which will help bolster your AFL physicality.

 Australian rules footballers need to be strong in their lower body as well. Any time you’re on the ground during a game, your legs are providing stability and power to help you stay upright or dominate your opponent. This is why players with good lower body strength tend to excel at AFL tackling. To improve lower body strength, you need to do trapbar deadlifts, barbell hip thrusts, and barbell box squats because those exercises increase lower body strength while minimising the risk for injury. The best way to build power output in your legs is by doing explosive movements like jump squats or depth jumps.

Check out our recent podcast on this topic: 

 

Australian rules footballers that want to improve AFL power should also focus on their posterior chain (lower back, glutes, hamstrings, and calves). You need to do Romanian deadlifts, glute bridges, back extensions, and reverse hypers to improve your posterior chain. Australian rules football players that perform heavy compound movements combined with explosive lower body exercises have the best chance of developing the physical attributes to be assertive in contested situations when playing Footy.

 How often should AFL players strength train to see optimal results on the field during matches and tournaments throughout the year?

Australian rules footballers need to train with weights 3-5 times per week for optimal results. Too many training sessions can lead to overtraining the nervous system, decreasing performance. During the season, footy players should train with weights 2-3 times per week and perform either total body sessions or split body parts i.e. upper body one day and lower body on the other day. Australian rules footballers need to avoid only performing isolation exercises while training with weights because they’re not as effective at developing strength and power.

For optimal results on the field, AFL players need to train with heavier weights for fewer repetitions. For example, six sets of 3 reps are better than 4 sets of 10 reps. It’s more important to do the exercises correctly with the guidance of experienced football strength and conditioning coach than to perform more sets or reps.

 Training Australian rules footballers is not different from training any other athlete. To see success on the field, athletes need to train with heavy weights for fewer repetitions to play stronger and faster during matches throughout the year. The off-season is the best time for athletes to work on strength and power because they can do extra work with no game load to recover from. The closer an athlete gets to game day, the closer they need to be working on speed and power with explosive movements like the ones listed in our YouTube playlist: 

 

What are some tips for ensuring that AFL players get the most out of their strength-training sessions?

Australian rules football players need to have a strong mind-muscle connection with all their exercises. If an AFL player can move heavier weights with proper technique, they’ll become more confident on the field, and that will help them be successful in performing tackling drills or being tackled by another player. As a result, strength training sessions aren’t just about lifting heavyweights. The main goal of strength training sessions is to build confidence in AFL players through quality movement and understanding the purpose of each exercise in the weight room.

Prepare Like A Pro offers premier training programs for footy players. We have face-to-face training that caters to the individual needs of athletes.

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Be updated with the new trends. Listen to your favorite athletes and learn from reliable coaches. Subscribe to Prepare Like A Pro Youtube and Podcast!