How many hours do AFL players train in seasonCategoriesBlog Training Program

How many hours do AFL players train during the season? | Prepare Like a Pro

Ever wondered what it takes to be at the top of your game in Australian Rules Football? AFL players are renowned for their incredible fitness levels and relentless training. But have you ever wondered how many hours they actually put in? Or what exactly goes on during their training sessions? Well, get ready to dive into the inner workings of AFL player preparation!

AFL players leave no stone unturned when it comes to training. During the season, they dedicate a minimum of 25 hours per week to honing their skills and conditioning their bodies. So, what does this rigorous schedule entail? Let’s break it down:

Physical, Skill-Based, and Tactical Training:

AFL players follow a comprehensive training schedule that encompasses three key components: physical, skill-based, and tactical training. Each aspect is crucial in preparing them for the challenges they’ll face on game day.

Physical Training: AFL players undergo rigorous strength and conditioning workouts to ensure they maintain peak fitness levels. These sessions focus on building strength, endurance, and overall physical resilience.

Skill-Based Training: Mastering the intricacies of the game is a vital part of AFL player development. They spend time practicing handpasses, kicks, marks, and tackles to sharpen their technique and improve their game performance.

Tactical Training: AFL is a strategic sport, and players need to be tactically astute. They engage in training sessions that focus on team strategies, positioning, and decision-making in various game situations.

The Weekly Training Routine:

Let’s take a closer look at how AFL players structure their training throughout the week:

Monday: After a couple of recovery days, players kick off the week with a light run-around session to get their bodies moving again. This is followed by skill-based training, which could involve drills like kicking circuits or handball games to fine-tune their technique.

Tuesday: Position-specific training takes center stage on Tuesdays. Players within the forward, midfield, and defensive lines work together to focus on specific aspects of their game, such as goal kicking or one-on-one contests.

Wednesday: Hump day means intense training. Players push their limits during skill and match practice sessions to fine-tune their abilities ahead of the upcoming game. Lower body strength and power training also take place to enhance performance on the field.

Thursday: Rest and recovery are key on Thursdays. Players take a day off to relax, engage in alternative activities, and rejuvenate their bodies for the challenges ahead.

Friday: The pre-game session, known as the captain’s run, is all about sharpening skills and maintaining intensity. Players focus on ball movement and kicking to prepare themselves mentally and physically for the game.

Saturday: Game day rituals come into play. Some players engage in light exercise or mindfulness activities to get in the right mindset before the match. Proper nutrition is also crucial for optimal performance on the field.

Sunday: Recovery mode is in full swing. Players take charge of their own recovery, utilizing techniques like Pilates, yoga, massage, and ice baths to promote healing and relaxation.

The Road to AFL Excellence:

AFL players are relentless in their pursuit of excellence. They understand that their bodies are their most valuable assets, and they invest countless hours in training and conditioning to reach their peak. Whether it’s lifting weights, fine-tuning skills, or focusing on tactical prowess, every aspect of their training is geared towards becoming the best in the sport.

So, if you’re an aspiring AFL player, take inspiration from their dedication and commitment. Embrace a comprehensive training program that covers physical fitness, skill development, and tactical awareness. Remember, the path to AFL success begins with a relentless work ethic and a burning desire to excel. Are you ready to take the first step? Contact us today to embark on your journey towards becoming

If you’re looking to improve your AFL running performance, then check out our Online AFL Training Program. Our program is designed to help you increase your speed, endurance, and running efficiency. Contact us today to learn more!

How many hours do AFL players train in season

If you’re looking to improve your AFL running performance, then check out our Online AFL Training Program. Our program is designed to help you increase your speed, endurance, and running efficiency. Contact us today to learn more!

 

 

 

 

If you’re looking to improve your AFL running performance, then check out our Online AFL Training Program. Our program is designed to help you increase your speed, endurance, and running efficiency. Contact us today to learn more!

How far do afl players run in a gameCategoriesBlog Training Program

How Far Do AFL Players Run In A Football Game? | Prepare Like a Pro

How Far Do AFL Players Really Run? Unveiling the Incredible Distance Covered by Aussie Rules Footballers!

When it comes to fitness, AFL players are in a league of their own. They possess the ability to run vast distances at astonishing speeds, all while making lightning-fast decisions and executing incredible feats of athleticism. It’s no wonder they’re considered some of the fittest athletes in the world!

Picture this: during a single game, the fittest AFL players have been known to cover mind-boggling distances of up to 18 kilometers. That’s right, 18 kilometers! Just try wrapping your head around that. It’s a testament to the physical demands of the sport and the exceptional conditioning required to excel in AFL.

Curious about the average distance covered by AFL players in a match? Thanks to cutting-edge GPS technology, we now have a pretty accurate estimation. On average, AFL players run an impressive 12-14 kilometers per game, with some exceptional athletes even surpassing the 20-kilometer mark. It’s an incredible display of endurance and stamina.

But it’s not just about the sheer distance covered. It’s also about the blistering speed at which these players move. When sprinting, AFL players can reach mind-blowing speeds of up to 35 kilometers per hour. That’s faster than most of us will ever run in our lives!

To achieve such phenomenal fitness levels, AFL players undergo rigorous training regimens. In-season training sessions typically involve running between 3 and 7 kilometers, while pre-season sessions can ramp up to 5 – 16 kilometers. These sessions often incorporate interval sprinting, a vital component of their conditioning. Picture this: short, explosive sprints of 20-40 meters at maximum effort, followed by a brief rest period. This type of training not only hones their on-field performance but also builds the endurance needed for the full duration of a game.

To conquer the demands of AFL, players must also have a high level of aerobic fitness. That’s why their conditioning programs emphasize both long, slow-distance running and shorter, high-intensity sprints. By incorporating interval training, which alternates between periods of high and lower-intensity activity, players maximize their oxygen utilization efficiency and significantly improve their endurance.

So, how can this information benefit you? If you’re an aspiring AFL player looking to enhance your aerobic capacity, incorporating fitness into training drills is key. Imagine starting a drill with an all-out burst of speed, followed by a period of jogging or walking to recover. This technique keeps your heart rate elevated while allowing for necessary recuperation. By gradually intensifying and extending your aerobic training, you’ll witness remarkable improvements in your fitness level, propelling you toward becoming a top-notch AFL player.

Another crucial aspect of AFL player conditioning is high-speed running. To adequately prepare for the demands of the game, AFL players typically cover a range of 300 to 600 meters at high speeds during in-season training sessions. Pre-season sessions push these boundaries even further, spanning distances anywhere from 500 to 3000 meters. This specific conditioning not only enhances their on-field performance but also significantly reduces the risk of injury.

Hear from Harry Sheezel AFL 2022 Draft top 10 prospect about his preparation for Aussie rules football: 

To accurately assess and track their aerobic fitness, AFL players and coaches rely on various tests. Some of the most commonly used tests include the beep test, yo-yo intermittent recovery test, and multistage shuttle run test.

The iconic beep test challenges players to run between two points 20 meters apart, with the pace quickening as beeps sound. The score is determined by the level at which the player can no longer keep up with the beeps. It’s a classic assessment of aerobic endurance.

The yo-yo intermittent recovery test pushes players to their limits as they repeatedly sprint back and forth between two points, adjusting the intensity

How far do afl players run in a game 1

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If you’re looking to improve your AFL running performance, then check out our Online AFL Training Program. Our program is designed to help you increase your speed, endurance, and running efficiency. Contact us today to learn more!

Collingwood football clubCategoriesBlog Training Program

Defining the “dose” of altitude training: how high to live for optimal sea level performance enhancement

Summary

The broader research of this study was to determine the minimal effective dose for living high and training low. This article suggest that previous altitude studies have shown that altitude training has had little effect on EPO and increasing red cell mass. The study hypothesized that the higher you live the greater the chronic stimulus to aerobic pathways and therefore Vo2 max and 3km time trial.
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Athletes were assigned to four different altitude living arrangements while going through a training block at the 1,250 m – 3000 m.

Critique

The research problem identified to develop a specific understanding of the differences in physiological adaptation when comparing living at different altitude levels.

As mentioned in the study altitude training has been proven to improve VO2 max for sub elite and elite endurance athletes. While effective in the developing physiological adaptation the individual variance amongst previous studies is significant, particularly with EPO response and red cell mass. This study is hoping to discover the optimal chronic living altitude for a least affective dose to achieve hematological acclimatization and thus aerobic capacity performance.

A randomized small group of 48 athletes were selected controlled study. After 4 weeks of sea level testing which included hematological, metabolic, and performance base line measures at sea level. athletes were randomly assigned to one of four living altitudes (1,780, 2085, 2454 or 2800 m).

Method

Summary

The research problem of this study was to quantify the most effective living altitude heights for improving aerobic capacity.
The subjects were randomly selected 48 collegiate track & cross country runners 32 men and 16 women close to the same age, weight & height of 21 – 24 years old, weighed 64 kg range of 8.4kg and 174cm range of 9cm.
Members were excluded if they didn’t fit the criteria of living altitude at or above 1500m, and or if injury or illness would impaired normal normal training.

Critique

The elimination for those living in the altitude zones, keeping physical traits similar and selecting healthy athletes from similar sporting back grounds helped eliminated any major bias about individual variance. Subjects were also matched by sex, training history, Vo2 max and a 3km time trial then randomly assigned to living one of the four living arrangements. Supervision from a staff member ensure living compliance. Athletes would only leave for grocery shopping and to train at the set intensity following the HiLo method. High intensity interval-based training completed at lower altitude of 1250 m. Moderate & low intensity training was completed at moderate altitude 1,780 – 3000m. I think the large range for moderate could be an issue for variability of results.
Assessment protocols were thorough and valid utilising previous research, Vo2 sub-maximal test assessed on a treadmill at a consistent pace 14km/h for men and 12km/h for women.

Results

Summary

This researched utilised reliable and valid testing measure to determine bench marking and test the effectiveness of the study.

Critique

The data obtained throughout this study was appropriate and completed with scientific methods.

The use of tables and graphs was an effective way to present the testing data. The in-text results contained all significant findings in relation to the four different groups.
Figure 2 is an effective way presented percent change in 3,000m time trial performance at sea level from post altitude and 2-week post altitude. Effective show casing the difference in results amongst the four groups, the graph was lacking a heading yet there was a blurb providing context and helped with understanding the block graph.

Discussion

Summary

The study set out to find the optimal living altitude for sea level performance enhancement omit aerobic capacity and physiology in endurance athletes when compared to different altitude living arrangements while completing the same training program.

The main findings from this study were that there was a large difference between the lowest altitude (1780m) when group compared to the other three groups. Including 44% less EPO changes, suggesting that living at higher altitude has a greater erythropoietic stimulus to increase red cell mass.

Performance increase in the 3km time trial for the two middle groups were superior (2 – 3%) when compared to the lowest and highest altitude groups whom had no change in 3km time trial.

Critique

The findings in this study showed significant difference in living at different altitude for 3km performance. The sample size was identified, and the study did a great job of filtering people from similar demographics while still randomly selecting the groups. Definitions and variables were all well explained to help with understanding what scientific terms like (Sa02) mean.

This study put to good use the current research on altitude training and living high training low for aerobic adaptation. While achieving their hypothesis of displaying the difference between living at different altitude heights, they also found contrast beliefs in that the highest altitude group didn’t achieve the greatest results.

I thought the limitation of this study was the dominance of male to female yet the study group did a good job to accommodate with adjust supplementation, the pace for sub max test and height/weight age of the athletes. Find the optimal living arrangements a few more groups could have been selected and a larger sample size of athletes now we have an idea that there is a sweet spot between 2085 – 2454m.

The discussion piece did a great job providing their opinion on why the highest group didn’t achieve the greatest results. Census being the acclimatization effects was more significant for this group and so the accumulation of poor-quality sleep and mountain sickness may have had negative effects on the training response and testing performance.

The implications of these findings were that there is difference in physiological response depending on what living altitude arrangement for living in high attitude. The practical take ways of this study were that the 1780m group wasn’t as effective as the middle two groups and the highest group had negative significant implications due to acclimatization.

Part 2: Reflection

Rationale
Strength & Conditioning (S&C)
I have chosen Strength & Conditioning as the target discipline I would like to focus on. I have the desire to be a head strength & conditioning coach at AFL level soon. Currently clarifying my S&C philosophy for elite athletes, I also have a strong passion for helping athletes prepare for high performance and sound S&C principles and methods help with this. I enjoy working in a team environment and I like the fact S&C’s must not only consider our own area of expertise but also the coaches, dietitian, sport psych and of course the athletes.

This article struck my interest as it wasn’t long ago where AFL clubs were keen on going away for altitude camps for physiology reasons also mental resilience. Understanding the science behind ideal living in high altitude could come in handy down the line when planning training camps.

Personal & professional strengths
My strengths from a personal point of view are:

I am a motivated and curios learner, I enjoy open and honest conversations on why people do things the way they do. I love to connect with those I’m working with whether it be athletes or staff. I value inclusivity and having an open-minded mindset. This helps me develop rapport with those I’m working with.

In relation to professional strengths:

My strength & conditioning experience started 13 years ago.
The time dedicated to coaching has helped me develop my communication and skill set to adjust my coaching to suit the environment I am working in.

Playing the game of football for 10 years and working with sub-elite and elite footballers in an S&C role for the last 7 years has helped me have a strong understanding of the demands of the sport.

I have the tools to help athletes with their athletic strength & conditioning goals.

Areas for future improvement

In my group-level communication, I am working to ensure my group-level communication is clear, engaging, and time efficient. Familiarizing myself with the recent research on velocity-based training for power development and Maximal aerobic conditioning prescription for team-based athletes.

Check out our coaches academy for more high-performance

What You Really Need to Know as a Strength Conditioning Coach 1
What You Really Need to Know as a Strength Conditioning Coach 1

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How to Train Specifically for Your PositionCategoriesBlog Training Program

How to train like an AFL Elite Midfielder | Prep Like A Pro

How to Train Specifically for Your Position
How to Train Specifically for Your Position

SPORT PROFILE FOR AN MALE AFL MIDFIELDER
KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

The AFL elite male midfielder position demand can change due to many factors such as dimensions of the ground, rotations, weather, and even if the player is playing inside or outside midfield position.

However, there are similarities amongst this playing position, especially when compared to other position game profiles like a key forward and or defender. (13)

This sports profile will dive into detail about the recent changes in demand for an elite midfielder playing in the Australian Football League (AFL) over the last decade.

Due to the dynamic nature of the midfielder’s position and the sport itself, this report will look at four key areas of performance for a midfielder. These four key areas are Physical, mental, tactical, and technical, leaning on the most up-to-date research to back our claims and ultimately provide insight into how to optimally prepare a midfielder for high performance!

 

 Competition requirements

Physical

Aerobic capacity

Repeat acceleration

Individualised approach

The AFL game is certainly getting faster and players particularly midfielders are required to cover the further distance in the same amount of game time.

This article will take a closer look at recent scientific research conducted on AFL players and look closely at the physical, mental, technical, and tactical key performance indicators for midfielders.

Part of this is the fact that AFL midfielders are playing on after a mark a lot more regularly during a game. Due to the demand for the game to ‘flow’ better and allow for more scoring rule changes like less time taken for umpires to restart play or take a shot for a goal. Reducing the rest periods for the players and increasing the demand for midfielders to set up at a stoppage in less time, all while reducing the total rotations allowed by the team.

Compared to other positions on the field midfielders covered on average cover more total distance (4) and still, produce a high amount of high-intensity efforts 2nd only mobile forwards (10)

Midfielders’ aerobic capacity and repeat accelerations are critical for midfielders to be able to handle the high volume of total distance and repeat high-intensity efforts. The current research suggests programming high-intensity aerobic interval training to improve aerobic power, match running performance, and greater involvement in the play. (12)

Midfielders’ ability to recover between games is crucial to preventing injuries while ensuring players are recovering appropriately. Varying the load from week to week as is recommended from a team perspective is important, we also need to factor in each athlete’s profile. (12)

Fitness testing ie 2km time trial and repeat sprint test we can identify which of the squad midfielders are aerobic and which are anaerobic dominant. With this information in mind, we may look to adjust the training load by reducing the total volume run for the aerobic midfielders and look to maintain or increase running volumes for the aerobic-based midfielders.

This graph represents the effect fatigue has on the players as the quarter goes on from the start to the 10-minute mark players start to reduce their work rate.  On average the midfielders and the mobile forwards ran the furthest for total distance and high-speed running.

Research like this one gives us confidence that improving a midfielder’s running capacity in a traditional conditioning manner in conjunction with specific football drills like small, sided games will increase the likelihood of increasing the player’s ability to express repeat high-intensity efforts in a game for longer. (10) Potentially giving the team a winning advantage over the competition.

Mental

Behaviour

Mental health

Psychological reactions to injury

Team behaviour can influence the tactical, technical, and physical side of performance. The key focus of Sam J Robertson’s research: Collective team behaviour of Australian rules football during a phase of math play investigated the difference in team behaviour with regards to possession and location on the field. (13)

Mental health which unfortunately is growing in its effect on AFL players and therefore key management practices from sports doctors at AFL clubs are critical. (14) Thirdly looking into the psychology of AFL players with regards to the reaction to injury. (15)

Although the sample size is small for the team behaviour article the findings were interesting, utilizing notational analysis methods to assess the effects players were positioning themselves during different stages of play. Clear differences were recorded with regards to length, width, and surface area were all typically greater during offense when compared to defense and contested phases. Team B pattern of greater values of length, width, and surface area during all phases of play when compared to team A. (13) Creating this extra space from an offensive point of view may be to help clear space for the forwards, from a physical point of view this style of play may increase the high-intensity efforts of the midfielders through creating space and being able to get back if the ball was in the contest as reported in this study both teams would aim to close space during contested situations.

AFL like many high-performance sporting codes have many mental health issues and the key to good management is the primary care providers the sports doctors. (14) This research conducted a questionnaire of best practices from experienced AFL sports doctors (96%) with 39% having worked for more than 10 years.

The findings fell within nine domains, 1. Prevention and mental health promotion activities 2. Screening and Risk identification 3. Engaging external specialists 4. Duty of care 5. Assessment, treatment, and case coordination 6. Communication 7. Confidentiality 8. Sleep management 9. Substance use management

A key takeaway is to ensure the club has an experienced sports doctor to look out for the players with best practices in conjunction with a multidisciplinary team to ensure the whole club approach to optimise prevention, identification, and treatment to manage players mental health. (14)

How do AFL athletes respond to injury?

For all those involved with working with AFL players understanding this concept is critical to the mental health of players. The results found in this study showcase how important it is to support AFL players going through rehabilitation.  A Player’s response tends to depend on the severity of the injury if its short term it can fall under the normality of injury as ‘all part of the game’, however, long term and stress can be high due to losing connection with their teammates, contract’s expiring, and not returning in the same physical shape. (15)

AFL players reported fluctuations of negative emotions during a longer-term injury such as shock, anger, disappointment, and the sense of feeling flat. Common for players to experience fear of missing out on games, and team structure resulting in feeling anxious, depressed, and moody.

A key takeaway is how often players reported feeling unfit and ‘rusty’ with their ball skills when returning to training and games.

The practical implementation of this is the importance of including cross-training, and plenty of touches either with a skills coach or another rehab player to ensure the midfield-specific skills were incorporated while the player was in rehabilitation to improve self-efficacy. Encouraging maintaining coach connection with the player is key to preventing players from feeling isolated, perhaps using video footage of a player’s high light reel, and mentioning a positive performance post an injury would be helpful in also building players’ confidence and feeling connected to the club. Furthermore, during the early stages of rehab, it’s important for medical and staff to incorporate plenty of variation to prevent boredom and for players to be involved in team activities wherever possible. (15)

Tactical

Field location

Passages of play for offense play

A longitudinal systematic review looked at the average physical output changes in AFL players from 2005 to 2017 and found rule changes and game style to be the most significant influence on the match demands of AFL players. (1)

What does this specifically mean for AFL midfielders? How does the game style have an effect? Well, the research shows AFL midfielders are required to work the hardest during offensive plays, compared to defensive and contested phases. (10)

This finding is consistent with the research on positional demands and field location found. (12) When team a team intercepts the ball, it is more likely that the opposition will not have their defensive zone structure in place. Allows for a greater opportunity to score and hence why midfielders get rewarded when they work hard during these passages of play. Key takeaway the ability of midfielders to work hard when the ball is turned the ball is key to team success due to the increased probability of a clearer path to goals. (3)

Technical

Effective Kicking

Ball in play

Effective Handball

While work rate is important for team success, effective technical actions are most important. (6)

 

Successful offensive plays resulting in a shot on goal appeared to be dependent on both physical output and technical skills. (5) As the table 2 when a team with high short kicking effectiveness on average win more quarters by a larger amount.

Table 4 shows how important handballing skills are for midfielders ranking the highest percentage of key position players

Players are likely to have increased workload and decreased skill proficiency when their team is less successful. (3) Having a program that focuses on developing kicking effectiveness is critical for team success.

Interested in joining our program for FREE? click this link to get started today.

 

How to Train Like an AFL Midfielder
How to Train Like an AFL Midfielder
3 Benefits for having a coach to individualise your programCategoriesBlog Elite Lifestyle Get Better Plan Training Program

3 Benefits of Having a Coach to Individualise Your Program | Prepare Like a Pro

When it comes to working out, many people think that they can do it on their own. This may be true for some people, but for the majority of us, having a personal coach—whether it’s for AFL conditioning, strength training, or anything in between—can be extremely beneficial. A personal coach can help you individualise your program and achieve your performance goals much faster than if you were working out on your own. In this blog post, we will discuss three benefits of having a coach!

What is Individualized Training?

Individualized training is a type of training that is specifically designed for an individual. (Alejo, n.d.) This type of training takes into account the individual’s goals, abilities, and weaknesses. Individualized training is different from group training because it is tailored to the needs of the individual rather than the needs of the group.

For example, an AFLW strength and conditioning coach might hone in on a particular player’s athleticism and work with her one-on-one to help her improve her game. This type of individualized training is much more effective than generic group training because it is specifically designed for the individual’s needs. Another example is AFL/AFLW fitness coaching, which focuses on helping an athlete improve their fitness and physical conditioning. This type of training is also tailored to the individual’s needs and can be much more effective than generic group training.

Benefits of Individualized Training

There are many benefits of individualized training, but we will discuss three of the most important ones. (Performance, n.d.)

1) Proper Education

Training for athletes has evolved over the years. No longer is the trial and error method of the past considered sufficient. Now, there is a greater emphasis on having a scientific approach to physical preparation that takes into account the unique needs of each athlete. This approach has many benefits, one of which is effective education. By tailoring training programs to the individual, coaches can ensure that athletes are receiving instruction that is relevant to their sport and their level of ability.

This allows them to avoid wasting time on drills that are either too easy or too difficult, and it also maximizes the athlete’s chances of success by ensuring that they are receiving targeted instruction. As a result, proper education is one of the many benefits of individualized training for athletes.

2) Confidence Boost

Being an athlete is not just about having the physical skill to perform well. It is also about having the mental strength and fortitude to push through difficult moments during a game or competition. This is where individualized training can be beneficial. When athletes receive customized instruction and attention, it can help to build their confidence.

They feel like they are able to achieve their goals because they are being supported and guided by someone who believes in their potential. This boost in confidence can be the difference between winning and losing. It can also mean the difference between enjoying the sport and giving up altogether. So, for athletes who want to take their performance to the next level, individualized training is definitely worth considering.

3) Safety and Effectiveness

When it comes to training for sports, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Every athlete is different, and what works for one person may not be the best option for another. That’s why many experts believe that individualized training is the way to go. By tailoring a training program specifically for each athlete, coaches can help ensure both safety and effectiveness. Training programs can be customized based on an athlete’s physical abilities, goals, and schedule. This allows athletes to focus on areas that need athletic improvement while avoiding injury.

In addition, because each program is designed with the athlete’s specific needs in mind, it is more likely to produce results. Whether you’re a professional athlete or a weekend warrior, individualized training can help you take your game to the next level.

The Bottom Line

Individualized training is becoming increasingly popular in the world of sports. And it’s easy to see why. There are many benefits of individualized training, including proper education, a confidence boost, and safety and effectiveness. So if you’re looking to take your performance to the next level, consider working with a Prepare Like a Pro strength & conditioning coach who can tailor a program specifically for you. You won’t be disappointed.

If you want to learn more about an individualized coaching program, or if you’re interested in working with a coach, contact Prepare Like A Pro. We have strength and conditioning coaches in Melbourne, Adelaide, and Sydney who can help you achieve your football goals. Visit the services page today to learn more.

Bibliography

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Playertek GPS reviewCategoriesBlog Coaches Elite Lifestyle Get Better Plan High Performance Players Training Program

Platform Review: Playertek GPS

Today, we’re going to be taking a look at the Playertek GPS football tracking system. This is a platform that allows you to track your performance on the football field, as well as monitor your team’s progress in real-time. We’ll be looking at how the system works, its features, and how it can benefit players and coaches alike. So, if you’re interested in learning more about this innovative new product, read on!

What is Playertek GPS?

Playertek is a wearable GPS tracker that monitors your on-field performance and provides real-time data and analysis (Boothype, n.d.). The device attaches to your jersey and has a small display that shows your maximum speed, distance covered, number of hard efforts, and other statistics like work rate. 

Playertek also has a companion app that provides more detailed information about your performance, including live data to monitor your training load as it happens.  The app also allows you to set training goals and track your progress over time. Whether you’re a professional player looking to gain an edge on the competition, a casual player who just wants to improve your game, or a strength & conditioning coach sports scientist looking to monitor your team’s progress, Playertek is a valuable tool.

Proof of the platform’s effectiveness is its popularity among all the AFL clubs. There are a few top-tier teams that have adopted Playertek GPS as part of their training regime. It is also widely used in the English Premier League and the United States by college, high school, and even professional teams in the National Basketball Association, National Football League, and Major League Baseball.

Playertek has proven to be a crucial tool for AFL and AFLW strength & conditioning coaching staff, allowing them to monitor player fatigue, recovery, and form. It has also been used by coaches to help plan training drills specific to the way they want the team to play and track player progress. On the other hand, strength & conditioning coaches have used Playertek to monitor athletes’ progress and ensure they are meeting their training goals.

In short, there is a lot that Playertek GPS can do for players and coaches at all levels of the game. If you’re looking to take your performance to the next level or simply want to get a better understanding of your game to better prepare yourself during the pre-season.

 

 

How Does Playertek Work?

 

 

The device uses a combination of GPS and GLONASS satellite tracking to monitor your movement on the field (Playertek, n.d.). It then sends this data to the companion app via Bluetooth, which is processed and displayed in an easy-to-understand format.

One of the key features of Playertek is its ability to track player load. The system uses a proprietary algorithm to monitor players’ movements and calculate their level of load. This information is then displayed in the app, so coaches can decide when to substitute players, or adjust training programs accordingly.

Playertek is also able to provide detailed heat maps of players’ routes, as well as heart rate data. This information can be used to identify areas where players are struggling or pinpoint areas of the field where they are most effective.

Other metrics that Playertek can measure and monitor are:

  • Activity Chart (speed every 0.1 seconds)
  • 5-minute breakdown (all metrics –great for reviewing performance within a game)
  • Season workload chart (view a player’s full season)
  • Player head-to-head comparison (same or another player, different periods or sessions, metrics, and heat maps)
  • Session Workload metrics – numbers and radar chart
  • Session Intensity metrics – numbers and radar chart
  • Daily Team charts –all selected players, all metrics in bar charts, and single-click PDF reports.
  • Monthly Team charts –all selected players, all metrics in bar charts, and single-click PDF reports
  • Field Coverage (Heat Maps)
  • Milestones and achievements (Maths, n.d.)

What are the Benefits of Having Playertek?

There are many benefits that come with having Playertek GPS. First, it provides coaches with valuable information about their players’ performance. This data can be used to decide on training programs, substitutions, and game strategies.

Additionally, Playertek is an excellent tool for player development. The platform can be used to track progress and identify areas of improvement. This information is valuable for coaches and players, as it can help tailor training programs and focus on specific areas.

Playertek is also a valuable tool for monitoring player fatigue. The system’s ability to track player movements and calculate work rate levels is an important tool for preventing injuries. By knowing when players are starting to feel fatigued, coaches can make decisions about when to substitute them or adjust training programs.

Finally, Playertek GPS is a great way to improve team communication. The platform’s ability to provide detailed heat maps and player routes is an invaluable tool for identifying areas of the field where players are struggling or finding success. This information can be used to make adjustments to game plans and strategies.

The Bottom Line

Playertek GPS is a powerful platform that can be used by coaches and players at all levels to improve performance. The system’s ability to track player movements, calculate work rate levels, and provide detailed heat maps is an invaluable tool for player development and game strategy. If you’re looking to take your game to the next level, Playertek is definitely worth considering.

Another way you can take your game to the next level is through Prepare Like A Pro. Whether you need personal attention or online training, Prepare Like A Pro can help Aussie Rule Football players prepare just like the pros do. Whether it’s through Melbourne strength training, online AFL coaching, or one-on-one sessions, we can help you take your game to the next level. Contact us today to learn more! 

Works Cited

Boothype. (n.d.). Retrieved from Playertek Review: Track and analyse yourself for greater performance

Playertek. (n.d.). Retrieved from Frequently Asked Questions 

Maths, W. U. (n.d.). Retrieved from PlayerTek: Sport Analytics

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Harry SheezelCategoriesBlog Elite Lifestyle Players Training Program

2022 top 10 draft prospect Harry Sheezel | Prepare Like a Pro

Considered to be one of the more naturally-talented footballers in the 2022 AFL draft, Harry Sheezel is a name that will be well-known to most footy fans by the end of the season. The 18-year-old from Melbourne has already shown he has what it takes to compete at the top level, having been named in the 2022 NAB AFL Academy – Australia U18 Team that took on Collingwood’s VFL team last month.

 

Sheezel is a powerful and athletic midfielder who is capable of playing both inside and outside. He has good speed and agility and is known for his hard work and determination. Sheezel is also a very good kick, which will no doubt be a valuable asset at the next level.

Sheezel is expected to be one of the first players—a surefire 10 draft pick—taken in the 2022 AFL draft, and he will no doubt be a big part of whatever team he ends up playing for. It will be exciting to see what he can do at the highest level, and footy fans should keep an eye on this young star in the making.

He is a full-time member of the Sandringham Dragons, and has made the most of his opportunity this season. Sheezel has set his claim as a rotating midfielder and has significant upside as a player who can win matches with his own boot after scoring 14 goals in six games, including bags of four and six goals.

Sheezel’s goal-kicking ability is well-known at this point, as seen by the aforementioned NAB League statistics. The deft medium type was also a standout in his lone Vic Metro appearance against the Young Guns, where he was thrust into the AFL Academy’s midfield late in the game on a day when his team’s forwards struggled. If his 28 disposals and six goals against Tasmania were a breakthrough game, his 37 touches against Northern in Round 9 served as the ideal audition for a permanent midfielder spot.

An Inspiration to the Jewish Community

Sheezel was only 16 when he experienced playing at the senior level, suiting up for his club Ajax in Victoria’s amateurs’ tournament last year. He earned the right, having emerged from the juniors program as the clear-cut best and brightest. During his debut, he kicked four goals from full-forward against Fitzroy at Brunswick Street Oval, including one goal that he described as “pretty good”.

“I had a bit of a day out,” Sheezel said in an article on AFL.com.au. “Playing juniors with Ajax was massive my whole life and it was so much fun to play with people from the community in the senior side as well.”

It was also during that time when Sheezel began feeling an immense outpouring of support for his football journey from the Jewish community. It also helped a great deal that Ajax is based in Melbourne’s inner south-eastern suburbs and is the country’s only Jewish football club.

With Jewish representation in the AFL historically low, Sheezel figures to be a role model for aspiring Jewish footballers not just in Melbourne, but also around the country. He is an AFL player of the future that the community can rally behind and one that could potentially inspire the next generation of Jewish footballers. To date, only Todd Goldstein (North Melbourne), Ezra Poyas (Richmond and Melbourne), and Julian Kirzner (Essendon, Carlton, and North Melbourne) have made it to the big stage of the AFL.

“There haven’t been as many Jewish footballers lately to make it into the AFL, so it’s kind of special to hopefully be the first one [drafted] in a while. Everyone has been so supportive and living it with me, in a sense,” Sheezel said.

“I hope to be pretty inspiring for younger kids as well because I feel like the Jewish community is really into the sport as well, they love their footy, so hopefully I can inspire a few more kids to hopefully go down the same path. 

 

 

“Along the way you see how much it means to people in the community. I never really thought of it until I’ve started to be in the media a little bit more and everyone is all over it now. It’s pretty cool. And at school it’s kind of new for them, they don’t really know how to act and neither do I so I just embrace it.”

Shezeel currently attends Mount Scopus—one of Australia’s foremost Jewish schools. It was there where he really got to learn more about his culture and faith, something that he is extremely proud of. Being at Mount Scopus has also given Sheezel the opportunity to focus on playing for the Dragons in the NAB League.

Sheezel has already shown that he is more than capable of shouldering the responsibility that comes with being a potential AFL footballer and an inspiration to the Jewish community. With his undeniable talent and character, there is no doubt that Harry Sheezel has what it takes to be a successful AFL player. All that’s left now is for him to take that next step and fulfill his dream.

“There’s still a long way to go and a lot of important games to be played. I don’t want to look too far ahead and just focus on each game and each month at a time, because the last two years have shown us that you just have to be present and do the best you can when you play because the next week and the future aren’t guaranteed,” Sheezel said.

“But I think about the draft every second. My life is oriented around it and footy. Everything I do I try to better myself to put myself in the best position I can.”

Sheezel is also one of the ambassadors of Prepare Like A Pro, an organization that helps young footballers with difficulties improve their athleticism, by teaching them sustainable lifestyle tips with a personalized program.

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The Latest Research on Ice Bath Recovery Methods and Its Connection to FootyCategoriesBlog Elite Lifestyle Get Better Plan Training Program

The Latest Research on Ice Bath Recovery Methods and Its Connection to Footy | Prepare Like a Pro

Ice baths are a popular way for athletes to recover after a strenuous workout, but there has been some debate about whether or not they are effective. A new study has shed some light on the matter and found that ice baths do have benefits for footballers. In this blog post, we will take a look at the latest research on ice baths, what AFL strength and conditioning coaches think about it, and what footballers should do to get the most out of them.

 What is an Ice Bath?

An ice bath is when you immerse your body in a tub of cold water and ice. The frigid temperatures help to reduce inflammation and pain, and can also speed up the healing process. Many athletes use ice baths after workouts or competitions, but they can be beneficial for anyone who is dealing with an injury or sore muscles. While the idea of an ice bath may sound daunting, the key is to start slowly and gradually work your way up to colder temperatures. You should also limit your time in the tub to no more than 20 minutes, as staying in for too long can actually lead to further inflammation. With a little preparation, an ice bath can be a powerful tool for managing pain and promoting healing. Strength and conditioning coaches across Australia endorse this recovery method and use it regularly with their athletes.

What is the Theory That Supports the Ice Bath Recovery Method?

The reasoning behind ice baths is that high-intensity exercise creates microtrauma or microscopic tears in the muscle fibers. This microscopic muscle injury is really a purpose of exercise because it promotes muscle cell activity, which aids in muscle healing and strengthening (muscle hypertrophy). However, it has been linked to DOMS (delayed onset muscular discomfort and soreness), which occurs 24 to 72 hours after exercise.

It is thought that the ice bath would:

  • Constrict blood vessels and drain waste items out of the damaged tissues, such as lactic acid.
  • Slow down physiological processes by lowering metabolic activity.
  • Swelling and tissue disintegration are reduced.

The enhanced blood flow from rewarming is thought to speed up circulation and, as a result, accelerate the healing process.

 What Does Research Say About This Particular Recovery Method?

The majority of research on the effects of ice baths and cold water immersion on exercise recovery and muscular soreness has come up with ambiguous or inconsistent results. Read on to find out what studies have come up with so far:

  • According to studies, icing muscles after a high-intensity workout reduces inflammation, slows muscle fiber growth, and delays muscle regeneration. This would be especially bad for athletes who are striving to bulk up their muscles.
  • When compared to rest or no intervention, a Cochrane review of 17 studies found some evidence that cold-water immersion reduced delayed onset muscle soreness. There was insufficient evidence to say if it helped deal with tiredness or recovery. Running studies revealed the most benefits. All of the studies were of poor quality, with no threshold for adverse effects and no active follow-up with participants.
  • An analysis of 13 research found a modest indication that contrast water therapy was better than passive recovery or rest at minimizing exercise-induced muscle soreness recovery, but the difference was minor. Contrast water treatment, cold water immersion, active recovery, compression, and stretching had little effect on muscular discomfort.

What are the Best Recovery Methods for AFL Players?

Now that we know a little bit more about the theory and research around ice baths, what other recovery options should AFL players consider for the best recovery from their workouts? The following methods have been shown to be most beneficial for muscle soreness and inflammation. These methods have been utilized by strength and conditioning coaches in Melbourne for their athletes. Check them out:

1) The RICE Method 

RICE is commonly used during the acute injury phase, it’s an acronym in the world of sports medicine. It stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. The RICE method is often recommended as a means of treating acute injuries, such as muscle strains or ankle sprains. The theory behind the RICE method is that it will help to reduce swelling and pain while promoting healing. However, there is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of this approach. Some studies have shown that ice may actually delay healing, and elevation has not been shown to have any significant impact on recovery. Despite the lack of scientific evidence, the RICE method remains a popular option for athletes seeking to recover from an injury.

2) Active Recovery

As an AFL athlete or strength and conditioning coach knows, the key to maintaining peak performance is to allow your body adequate time to recover from strenuous activity. Too much exercise without enough rest can lead to fatigue, injury, and a decrease in overall performance. While complete rest is important, recent research has shown that active recovery – low-intensity exercise performed during the recovery period – can actually speed up the recovery process. Active recovery helps to increase blood flow to the muscles, which helps to remove waste products and deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients. In addition, active recovery helps to reduce muscle soreness and improve range of motion. As a result, active recovery can be an effective means of helping athletes recover from strenuous exercise and preventing injuries. 

3) Stretching

No matter how fit you are, athletes will always suffer from some form of muscle soreness, especially after a strenuous workout or competition. While there’s no surefire way to prevent this type of discomfort, stretching can help to loosen tight muscles and promote blood flow, which can speed up the healing process. Additionally, stretching can improve your range of motion, helping you to avoid injuries in the future. For these reasons, it’s important to make stretching part of your post-workout routine. If you’re not sure where to start, there are plenty of resources available online or you can ask a strength and conditioning coach at Prepare Like A Pro to help you get started on the right foot. So don’t forget to stretch – your body will thank you for it! 

4) Yoga

Yoga has been shown to be an effective means of helping athletes recover from injuries. Studies have shown that yoga can help to improve range of motion, flexibility, and strength. In addition, yoga can also help to reduce pain and inflammation. As a result, it is not surprising that many athletes are turning to yoga as a way to speed up their recovery. While there are many different styles of yoga, all of them can be helpful for injury prevention and recovery. For example, Hatha yoga focuses on slow, gentle movements, while Ashtanga yoga is more fast-paced and intense. However, the most important thing is to find a style that works for you and that you enjoy. By incorporating yoga into your training routine, you can help to improve your overall performance and reduce the risk of injury.

Check out our recovery playlist for some how-to videos:

Conclusion

So there you have it – four different methods that can help you to recover from a strenuous workout or competition. Of course, this is not an exhaustive list, and there are many other options available. But these are a great place to start if you’re looking for ways to speed up your recovery. And remember, the most important thing is to listen to your body and tailor your recovery methods to fit your individual needs. So experiment with different methods and find what works best for you.

If you need proper guidance or instructions on how to prepare yourself for the rigors of playing AFL, get in touch with Prepare Like A Pro. We can help you to create a personalized training program that will help you to reach your peak performance.

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How to Train Like an AFL Speed Forwarder DefenderCategoriesBlog Elite Lifestyle Players Training Program

How to Train Like an AFL Speed Forwarder & Defender

An AFL speed forwarder and defender train by doing a variety of exercises that help them improve their speed and agility. One of the most important things for these players is to be able to change direction quickly. This allows them to get around opponents and make tackles which are key performance indicators for speed forwards and defenders. In this blog post, we will discuss how AFL speed forwards & defenders train and look at the exercises that these players do to improve their performance on the field.

What is an AFL Speed Forward?

An AFL speed forward is a player whose primary role on the field is to create space and get down the pitch quickly. This can be done through a variety of different techniques, from using quick cuts and changes of pace to making big, hard-cutting runs. Whatever their method, effective speed forwards are key players in any successful AFL team because they help to open up passing lanes and break down defensive formations.

Due to the demanding nature of their role, speed forwards requires tremendous levels of athleticism and endurance in order to perform at the highest level for an entire game or match. And because the speed forward position requires such a high degree of skill, many teams will seek out young players with a natural flair for moving quickly across the field and making snap decisions in order to cultivate them into top-level athletes. 

What is an AFL Speed Defender?

 

An AFL speed defender is a type of player who excels at intercepting and defusing the opposition’s forward thrusts. Typically, these players are top athletes with superior speed, agility, and coordination. They are experts at reading the play and positioning themselves to cut off offensive drives, catch passes, steal the ball, and disrupt offensive sets.

Because they have such an important role on the field, AFL speed defenders often work closely with their team’s coach to strategize about how to deal with different types of offensive attacks. At the highest levels of competition, AFL speed defenders have to be fast learners and highly adaptable in order to keep up with the ever-changing movements of their opponents. Whether it’s testing new defensive formations or refining their skillset through drills and training sessions, these players never stop working to become better at what they do.

How Do AFL Speed Forwarder & Defender Train?

So how do these players train? For starters, both speed forwards and defenders need to have a base level of fitness to perform at the highest level. This means that they need to be able to run long distances and sprint without tiring. What kind of AFL fitness training should these players be doing?

One of the most important things for speed forwards and defenders is to be able to change direction quickly. This can be done through a variety of different exercises, such as sprints, agility drills, and plyometric exercises. These exercises help to improve the player’s coordination and balance, which are essential for changing direction quickly on the field. 

Plyometric exercises are a type of exercise that helps to improve explosive power. These exercises are often used by athletes who need to generate a lot of force in a short period of time, such as sprinters and jumpers. Some examples of plyometric exercises include box jumps, medicine ball throws, and jump squats. These exercises help to improve the player’s ability to generate force quickly, which is essential for sprinting and making quick changes of direction. 

In addition to plyometric exercises, speed forwards and defenders also need to do a lot of sprint work. This helps them to develop the endurance and leg strength necessary for running long distances at high speeds. Sprinting also helps to improve the player’s coordination and balance. 

Speed forwards and defenders also need to have a strong upper body. This helps them to be able to shrug off tackles, maintain their balance when being pushed around, and generate more force when tackling or jumping. Upper body strength can be developed through a variety of different AFL strength & conditioning exercises, such as weightlifting, push-ups, and pull-ups. 

Finally, speed forwards and defenders need to have good mental toughness. This helps them to deal with the challenges of playing such a demanding position. They need to be able to maintain their focus for long periods of time and make quick decisions under pressure. Many players find that meditation and visualization techniques help them to develop the mental toughness necessary for success on the field.

By following a proper training regimen that impacts the necessary AFL fitness components, speed forwards and defenders can become some of the most dangerous players on the field. They possess a unique combination of speed, agility, strength, and mental toughness that allows them to take over games and make plays that other players simply cannot. If you’re looking to take your game to the next level, then emulating the training regimen of an AFL speed forward or defender is a great place to start. 

Watch our presentation on how a developing speed forward and defender should train to maximise performance: 

Want to take your game to the next level? Then You Must Prepare Like a Pro

Contact us to get started on your journey to becoming an AFL speed forward and defender. Our expert coaches will help you every step of the way with tailored programs and drills that will improve your athleticism and confidence. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced player, we can help you take your game to the next level.

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AFLW Athlete Development CoachesCategoriesBlog Coaches Training Program

AFLW Athlete Development Coaches

The AFL Women’s (AFLW) rising popularity has given rise to a vital role in Australian Rules Football – Athlete Development Coach. This article explores their roles and responsibilities, emphasizing their importance in developing AFLW players.

Watch highlights from the 2022 grand final: 

What is the AFLW?

The AFLW, which started in 2017 with 8 teams, has been a significant milestone in women’s football. Moreover, the league expanded to 10 teams in 2019 and then to 14 teams in 2020, signifying its rapid growth and popularity. Notably, it’s highly attended and popular worldwide. For instance, the 2019 Grand Final saw a record-breaking 53,034 attendees. As a result, this tremendous success sparked significant interest among women players, ultimately leading to the rise of AFLW Athlete Development Coaches. Now, let’s delve into their crucial and transformative role.

What is an Athlete Development Coach?

An Athlete Development Coach specializes in improving athletes of all levels, ranging from beginners to elite players. They play a pivotal role in sports clubs or organizations, meticulously creating and implementing tailored training programs to enhance skills and performance. At Prepare Like A Pro, you can find these dedicated coaches with a wealth of knowledge and experience in AFLW strength & conditioning, fitness training, and running programs. Consequently, they play a vital and multifaceted role in developing AFLW players, helping them reach their full potential and achieve excellence on and off the field.

Check out our AFLW collaborative event:

The Roles of an Athlete Development Coach

Athlete Development Coaches have several crucial roles and responsibilities. Let’s explore them through subheadings:

1. Help Players Improve Their Performance

Athlete development coaches play a vital role in enhancing athletes’ performance on game day. They identify areas for improvement through comprehensive evaluation and analysis. By designing specific training programs with drills and exercises targeting these areas, coaches provide ongoing feedback and support to keep athletes on track.

2. Create Training and Development Programs for the Athletes

Athlete development coaches tailor training and development programs to each athlete’s unique needs, helping them overcome obstacles and achieve their goals. Drawing on their understanding of human performance science, they focus on improving different AFLW fitness components like strength, power, and endurance.

3. Assist with the Design and Implementation of Applied Strength and Conditioning Programs

These coaches collaborate with other specialists in strength, nutrition, psychology, and physiotherapy to create comprehensive programs that optimize AFLW players’ strength, agility, coordination, and stamina.

4. Work Closely With All Members of the Team and Organize, Plan, and Oversee Athletes and Coaches

Athlete development coaches foster collaboration among athletes, coaches, and support staff by developing training and practice plans aligned with the team’s goals. Through monitoring and adjustments, they guide athletes and teams toward success.

5. Effective Communication and Relationship Building

These coaches must communicate clearly and concisely with all team members, listening attentively to understand different perspectives. Building strong relationships helps create a cohesive environment where everyone works together toward the same goal.

If you are interested in improving your AFLW athleticism or becoming a part of the development process for future AFLW athletes, consider reaching out to Prepare Like A Pro, an organization with years of experience developing elite-level footballers. They can help take your game to the next level.

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